Working Moms Raise Successful Daughters and Caring Sons

July 1, 2015 § Leave a comment

29F5D60900000578-3138860-image-a-35_1435227167886A new Harvard Business School study should eliminate “working mom guilt”.  Moms who work outside the home may be doing something really positive for their children.  And that’s a good thing since nearly three-quarters of American mothers with children at home are employed.

The study reports daughters of working mothers are more likely to be employed, hold supervisory positions, and earn more money than daughters of non-employed moms.  In the United States, daughters of working moms earned 23% more than daughters of stay-at-home mothers.

The working paper (pdf) published June 19 by the Harvard Business School also found that working moms also had a statistically significant effect on their sons.  The sons are more likely to spend time caring for family members and doing household chores than are sons of stay-at-home moms.  In fact, the sons here in the U.S. spent seven and a half more hours a week on child care and 25 minutes more on homework.   The study did not show an influence on the careers of sons because there has always been an expectation for men to work outside the home.

We working moms seem to impart different attitudes towards gender roles to our children which have an impact on their attitudes towards work and home life.  The researchers found that 33% of daughters of working mothers held supervisory roles, compared to only 25% of daughters of stay-at-home moms.

While the mommy wars may continue on some level, it is clear that having a working mothers has economic, educational and social benefits for children of both sexes.

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The Importance of the Female Football Fan

August 16, 2014 § 1 Comment

imageFootball season is upon us and women are gearing up for the season. Yes, women are a real target and marketing to women has never been more important.   Advertisers know who is buying all those wings and chips for the game.  But the female factor goes beyond just supplying the game day food.

“Women are the custodians of most decisions made in the households,” said Mark Waller, the chief marketing officer of the N.F.L. Describing football as “the last great campfire,” which brings families together on Sundays as reliably as church, Waller said women were at the heart of the sport’s most sacred rituals.

The Facts – NFL

More women are regular season viewers of NFL football than NBA and Major League Baseball.  Some 23-28% of women watch between 6 and 10 hours of football per week.

45% of NFL fans are women.  And 55% of women watch football on television. Over the past decade, average viewership of prime-time NFL games has increased by 31 percent to 20.3 million, according to Nielsen.  In 2013, every network that had broadcast games reported increased viewership. Most weeks, in fact, NFL games aren’t just the most-watched sporting events on television — they’re the most-watched thing on TV.

Nine out of 10 top viewed single programs in 2013 were live football events. The only one that wasn’t football was the Oscars. Football has become the only real time event that gathers the whole family in front of the television.

More women watch the Super Bowl than the Oscars, Grammys and Emmys combined.

The NFL has focused on giving women more than men’s jerseys for the past few years and sales of women’s apparel have tripled over the past four years.

The Facts – The Advertising

Just like we have seen the influence of marketing to women in the Olympics and World Cup Soccer, the top rated commercials during the Super Bowl 2014 definitely appealed to women, Budweiser’s Puppy Love, Dorito’s Cowboy Kid, and Budweiser’s Hero’s Welcome.

The Facts – College Football

39% of college football fans are women. In college, more than 49 million fans turned out to watch a college game in the stands but more than 216 million tuned in to watch a game.

The Facts – At Home

Homegating is a real thing.   Football is as much a tradition for Sundays than going to church?  It is the one place where family and friends can group around a single event.  And eat.  Super Bowl Sunday is the second-largest food consumption day of the year, behind only Thanksgiving, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture.

According to Bud Light, female fans (45-percent) are 10-percent more likely than male fans to socialize during a game.

20% of Fantasy Football Fans are women.

The Facts – Influence

Last year, Barna found that Americans believe athletes have a greater influence than any faith leaders. And in a new 2014 study, more than four in 10 women (41%) strongly agree that sports are an important part of American culture.

More than Just Fans

Women are more likely to be fans for life. Women are more brand loyalists and it seems that football teams are really brands.  But increasingly, women are becoming more than just fans or  grown-up cheerleaders for football. They are playing in football leagues, coaching, sportscasting and taking on referee roles.   Sarah Thomas is a name you will likely here this year as the first female referee in the NFL. She shattered the male dominated profession seven years ago at the collegiate level, officiating games for Conference USA. She was the first female official at the NCAA’s Division I level, and the first to work a college bowl game.

Marketing to Women

Marketing to women is often a delicate science of respecting their gender and not falling into some pink state of condescension. It’s not a world of “pink it and shrink it” anymore.

But the stakes are high for females. The male market is tapped out. Women represent the growing side of the football market. But female football fans are dealing with lots of contradictory issues. Health issues are huge for those moms of budding and current NFL players. Violence often makes headlines with players in the headlines for everything from domestic assault to murder. Women were particularly upset with the slap-on-the-wrist two-game suspension for Ravens Ray Rice who knocked his fiancé unconscious in a casino earlier this year, but he was ultimately handed an indefinite suspension.

And at the same time, we see the tremendous good that comes from the sports community service. Individual players have foundations that work with kids, support charities and volunteer in the community.

But all that pink?   Once a year, the NFL sponsors a breast cancer awareness game where players wear pink shoes and gloves and a portion of the pink NFL merchandise sales goes to the American Cancer Society.

Can football continue to grow?  It seems it will take a deep understanding of women and their role in the game – as mothers, as sports professionals, and as fans.

 

Marketing to Non-Moms: The Nuclear Family Blown Up!

June 7, 2014 § 2 Comments

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47% of women of childbearing age in the US do not have kids.

Having the perfect marriage and the nuclear family of two parents, 2.5 kids, and a house in the suburbs is no longer the ideal of many women.   There is now a significant portion of women who are not marrying, marrying later, living single, living with a same-sex partner, divorced, or widowed.  One-third of all women, or 19 million women, do not have children.

DeVries Global has done research on women in 2014 with a specific focus on “The Otherhood” – women who do not have children by choice or chance.  Research shows this is a large group; some 47% of women of the childbearing age in the US do not have kids.  

Here are some of the insights about these independent women who are not parents.

1.  Well educated and Smart.  The research found that 75 percent of women without children had some college or above, compared to 67 percent of women with kids. Additionally, 37 percent have a Bachelor Degree or higher while almost 10 percent have an advanced or professional degree.

2.  Social Clout.  These women have an extremely large social network consisting of more than 1500 friends and followers across several social media platforms.  She spends approximately the same amount of time on social networks as moms (28 hours per week!) but her choices might be less Facebook and more Pinterest.

3.  Spending More Per Person.  She is spending outspending mom on a per person basis.  She is spending double on beauty and personal care and 35% more per person on groceries.  She is more likely to shop in a drugstore than a Wal-Mart or Target.  She has a monthly budget and she uses coupons.  She is slightly more likely to compare prices online.

4.  Finding Success, Then Love.  The top priorities in her life are career success and love.  Oh, and love does not necessarily mean marriage.  They rank marriage and having kids well behind finding love.  Many want to establish their careers before they consider marriage.  It’s more about self-reliance.

Dr. Janet Taylor observes, “Having it all doesn’t just mean you are a working woman who is a mom, having it all means having a life that has meaning and purpose. If you are single and childless, you can still have that.

5.  Loving Children.   The study found that children play an active role in the lives of 80 percent of non-moms.  And 36% of non-moms are voluntarily without children.    When asked if they wanted children of their own, the group had diverse answers. While being an aunt is enough for some, nearly half (46%) of non-moms want to be mothers. Some 18 percent are on undecided.  For those undecided or do not want children, giving up their freedom was the number one reason non-moms were hesitant about having children.

6.  Free to Travel.  Women are living an independent lifestyle, traveling more often and many times alone.  Fifty-nine percent say travel is a passion.  Non-moms spend 60% more days abroad per year than moms, and those that are in a relationship spend more than twice as much time away with their partner than mom.

7.  Happy and Fulfilled.  Non-moms can find happiness in rich and intimate friendships, meaningful careers, lives of adventure, and love in different forms.  There is no longer a stereotype that having children is the only path – 80 percent of non-moms felt they could lead a happy life without children, whether or not they want children of their own.

How to Reach these Independent Women

•  Show her life with authenticity.  Don’t focus just on the work component.

•  Celebrate her independence, resilience and autonomy.

•  Recognize her influence online and her taste.

•  Look for opportunities to market to her like solo travel experiences.

•  Segment her psychographic group as a target audience, looking at her buying habits and needs.

 

 

 

Marketing Demographics: Nine Facts about the New Face of America

April 30, 2014 § 1 Comment

cheeriosDemographics have a whole new face in America.  We are not the Cleavers anymore; we truly are more like The Modern Family.

For those of us who have been in marketing for years, the ubiquitous demographics fell into chunks of age groups, marital status, presence of children, job title and ethnicities that allowed us to purchase mass audiences with ease.  While those demos might change per product, the world seemed a static place.  But today’s world is changing in ways we could not have imagined at the heyday of mass media.  We need to adjust our thinking and our marketing to these new realities.

We have tried to capture just a few of the seismic shifts happening, as identified by Pew Research.

1.  America is becoming multi-colored.  Pew describes it best by saying that “we were once a black and white country.  Now, we’re a rainbow.”   Currently America is 64% white, 12% black, 16% Hispanic, 5% Asian and 3% other.  By 2060, we are projected to be 43% white, 13% Black and 31% Hispanic.   The immigrants of the early 20th century were all European.  Half of all immigrants in the last half of the 20th century and early 21st century have been from Latin America. But the truth is we are moving to a much more homogenized appearance.  Some 43% of Millennial adults are non-white, the highest share of any generation.  The majority of Americans are estimated to be non-white by 2043.

2.  Intermarriage is blurring racial lines.  Racial intermarriage was frowned upon in earlier years and downright illegal in nearly one-third of the states.  Today one in six marriages are inter-racial or mixed ethnicities.  Even President Obama, Tiger Woods, and Bruno Mars are examples of the new mixed ethnicity and culture we see in today’s world. Half of all newborns in the United States is non-white. Stephen Stearns, a Yale professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, says globalization, immigration, cultural diffusion and the ease of modern travel will gradually homogenize the human population, averaging out many racial traits, and making the presence of brown skin much more prevalent.

SDT-next-america-03-07-2014-0-023.  Marriage is deemed less important today.  Just 26% of Millennials (age 18-33) are currently married. When Gen Xers were the same age some 36% were married, and 48% of Baby Boomers were married.  More than 65% of the Silent Generation (ages 65 and older) were married when they were aged 18-33.  Some think that the recession had a lot to do with delayed marriages among Millennials, but there are many factors.   Some 44% of Millennials say that marriage is becoming obsolete.  Today’s couples are marrying later, sometimes after they have started a family, or not at all.   In 2012, 47% of births to Millennial women were non-marital, compared with 21% among older women.

4.  Parenthood is valued over marriage.  Maybe it’s because the stigma of out-of-wedlock births is fading, or today’s parents saw too many broken relationships among their parents.   But in today’s world millennials value the parent experience over marriage.  A 2010 Pew Research survey found that 52% of Millennials say being a good parent is “one of the most important things” in life.  Just 30% say that having a successful marriage is one of the most important things.

SDT-next-america-03-07-2014-0-015.  Millennials are detached from institutions.  Some 29% of Milliennials are religiously unaffiliated, compared to 16% of their Boomer parents.  And 50% of them consider themselves political independents, yet they are more liberal.   The connections that they establish are online.  They are digital natives in the center of their social world.

6.  Breadwinner Moms  are prevalent.   Today, four in ten households with children under 18 include mothers who are either the sole or primary source of income for the family. Some 50 years ago, that number was one in ten.  The “breadwinner moms” are made up of two very different groups: 5.1 million (37%) are married mothers who have a higher income than their husbands, and 8.6 million (63%) are single mothers.  This growth is tied to many trends including the fact that women make up some 47% of the today’s workforce.  Today only 20% of children live in households with a married stay-at-home mother with a working husband, compared to 41% of children in 1970.

7.  Young women are succeeding in education, jobs and pay. Young women are more educated than men.   Thirty eight percent of women aged 25-32 have at least a four-year degree, compared with 31% of men.  They are also beginning to be paid at near parity with men.  Women’s earnings in this age group were 93% of their male counterparts in 2012.  Another new change among married women was noted in 2012, 21% had spouses who were less educated than they were—a 3x increase from 1960.

 8.  Grandparents are Second Parents.  One in ten children live with a grandparent and many are being cared for primarily by a grandparent.  In 80% of the households where children are living with a grandparent, at least one of the child’s parents is also in the household.   The reasons for this care are teen parents, disability, unemployment and parent school enrollment.  Grandparents are an important force in most families.  Some 75% of Boomer grandparents are involved in the raising of their grandchildren, and using that disposable income on Junior.

9.  The Aging of America is happening every day.  For all of our years, our age ranges have looked like a pyramid, with babies at the bottom and just a few 85+ at the top.  But from 1960 to 2060, our pyramid is going to turn into a rectangle. We will have almost as many Americans over age 85 as under age 5. This is the result of longer life spans and lower birthrates.  Today, 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day between now and 2030.

Marketing to Working Moms: New Scarborough Study!

January 29, 2014 § 1 Comment

Working Moms may have had a “pink collar” image in former generations, but today’s working mom is quite a different person.  They are more educated,  more affluent and more wired than ever before.  Working Moms represent 40% of moms.

Scarborough has surveyed this group and come up with some interesting statistics that marketers need to market to women, particularly working moms.  Here are just a few to whet your appetite.   For more, see the infographic below.

95% of working moms agree that spending time with their family is their top priority

27% of working moms are much more involved in their finances.  

72% of their households contributed to a charity in the past 12 months.

Working moms are spending less for name brands.  They use coupons and shop at Nordstrom Rack, Kohl’s Macy’s and TJ Maxx Home Goods.  

Working moms shop online and own smartphones, laptops, iPads and more.

Working moms are 22% more likely to attend professional sporting events and 24% more likely to have watched ESPN in the past 7 days.

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Marketing to Hispanic Women: The Power Grocery Shoppers

January 23, 2014 § 1 Comment

Hispanics are a growth target for consumer product brand marketers.  A new eMarketer study finds that Hispanics do more grocery shopping than the average US shopper and they spend 20% more during routine trips.  For marketers, it is also important to know that they are heavy online users as well.

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Hispanics have a strong family culture.  Some say that 75% of  their families have a traditional sit-down meal every day.  And Hispanics also take their friends and family with them when they shop.  Hispanics grocery shop with family or friends on nearly 80% of their shopping trips.

1460998_737861562909145_449029842_nTheir social nature also extends to social media.  eMarketer estimates that in 2012, 68.9% of Hispanics were using social networks, compared with 66.2% of the total US population. They are also more likely to post reviews and participate with brands.  A Post brand manager for Honey Bunches of Oats reported that their Spanish Facebook page garnered more than three times the engagement levels of their non-Hispanic page.  Currently the page has 211,000 likes.

Mobile is also an important part of their digital profile.  Their use of mobile and smartphones while shopping is higher than any other ethnic group.  They are more likely to compare product prices, call or text a family member about a product and look for a coupon.

Are you leveraging your Hispanic audience?

Holiday Marketing to Women: Instant Greetings vs. Greeting Cards

November 16, 2013 § Leave a comment

It’s the time of the year when we begin thinking about sending holiday greetings to friends and family far and wide.  Will it be an online greeting this year or a sentimental real paper card with pictures of the family and a special note?  Will it be written in cursive or typed away on a convenient laptop?  Will it be mailed with a 46-cent stamp or whisked through the web at no cost?

img_easy-christmas_ss16Have we lost our social graces?  Or are we entering a new phase of how we relate our love?  It seems we are in a cultural shift brought about by technology, budget concerns, digital natives and time deprivation.

Decline of Traditional Greetings

The United States Postal Service, which has its own problems, reported that the number of greeting cards mailed within the US declined by 24 percent from 2002 to 2010 and is still dropping.  A perfect storm of migration to online services, a financial recession, busy lifestyles and younger digital consumers are creating new traditions for holidays and special days like birthdays.

A  greeting cards industry report this year from IbisWorld says the sale of traditional cards has fallen by 60 percent over the last decade, to $5 billion a year.  Last year Hallmark reported that their 2012 card sales dropped to 5 billion, from 6 billion in 2011. And American Greetings has had to go private after a 60% decline in revenue.

Growth of Digital Greetings

Remember your birthday this year?  Chances are you got more Facebook Birthday greetings than you ever received cards?  Why?  Well, it’s so easy.  Facebook reminds you.  And you can even send a gift card if you want to really express some love.  With Facebook, those annual holiday letters are not as important anymore.  We see regular updates of our friends and know what is going on in their lives.

All the while, e-greetings are growing.  Online card sales  (both e-cards and custom printed ones) have grown to $3.5 billion in 2012 from just $65 million a decade ago.  Both Hallmark, the number one provider, and American Greetings, the number two, have digital greetings divisions.  And there are a plethora of other greetings companies like Egreetings, Blue Mountain, someecards and Dayspring.  The trends are to more personalized or more irreverent cards than the traditional drugstore cards.

Growth of Handmade Cards

At the same time, there is a resurgence in small companies that provide special handmade cards.  With a higher price than normal cards, the handmade card is actually the gift itself.  There is also a big business in crafting for card making.  Just ask the ladies at my church who make very special cards with special design stamps, craft supplies, pictures and glue.

So what’s your choice this year?  Let me know how you will share your holiday greetings?

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